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Home 03 August 2020
Culture Folk Culture - People The People Jews Larissa

Hat seller Abraham Sason Zaharia, Larissa, 1950
(Photo: Archives of Esdra D. Moise & Families of the Jewish Community of Larissa)
Tinsmiths, father and son, David and Makis Arar Larissa (1955)
(Photo: Archives of Esdra D. Moise & Families of the Jewish Community of Larissa)
Car body repair shop of Menahem Moise. On the right, his son who was a victim of Holocaust.
(Photo: Archives of Esdra D. Moise & Families of the Jewish Community of Larissa)
The pedlar Albert Moise with his goodies, Larissa, 1945
(Photo: Archives of Esdra D. Moise & Families of the Jewish Community of Larissa)
Sisters Mouson Eskenazi in the yard of their house, Pineios Street, Larissa.
(Photo: Archives of Esdra D. Moise & Families of the Jewish Community of Larissa)
Albertos Tarabouloys in his grocery shop with his children, Larissa, (1953)
(Photo: Archives of Esdra D. Moise & Families of the Jewish Community of Larissa)

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Topics
Vlachs
Jews
Sarakatsanoi
Emigres of Anatoliki Romylia
LOCATION
Larissa
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07/11/2008
The Jewish Presence in Larissa 2st part

Rita Moise

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The Community of Larissa developed significantly between the 15th and the 18th centuries, when it was given the title "Madre d' Israel" Its progress stopped during the Turkish domination. In 1881, when Larissa was liberated from the Turks, the population of the city were 13,000 inhabitants, 2,200 of whom were Jews.
Most of the Jews of Larissa lived, and still live today in an area called "Exi Dromoi", also known as "The Hebraica" ("The Jewish Quarter").

The Jewish quarter of Larissa did not have the form of a "ghetto" like was the case in other cities. Jews and Gentiles lived there in harmony and in friendly terms. The Jewish quarter is at the centre of the city and at a very short distance from the Synagogue, the Hebrew school and other communal institutions.